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Are People With Endometriosis Eligible for Moderna and Johnson & Johnson Booster Shots?

Posted on November 02, 2021
Medically reviewed by
Dan Martin, M.D.
Article written by
Alison Channon

  • People with endometriosis may be eligible for additional doses of the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, depending on personal health factors.
  • All adults who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine are eligible for a booster shot regardless of health status.
  • Health agencies have also approved “mix and match” boosters, meaning a person may receive initial doses of one type of COVID-19 vaccine and a booster of another.

The Centers for Disease for Control and Prevention (CDC) released recommendations for Moderna and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccination boosters on Oct. 21. Based on the new recommendations, adults with endometriosis who received the Moderna vaccine may be eligible for a booster depending on personal factors, and all adults who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine are eligible regardless of health status or other factors. Additionally, the CDC and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have approved mix and match boosters, which allow people to receive initial doses of one type of COVID-19 vaccine and a booster of another.

Booster Shot Eligibility

The following groups are now eligible for a booster shot at least six months after their second dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine:

  • People over 65
  • People over 18 who have underlying medical conditions
  • People over 18 who live in long-term care facilities
  • People over 18 who live or work in high-risk settings (such as front-line workers or people who are incarcerated)

The FDA and CDC approved booster shots of the Pfizer vaccine for the same groups in September.

The CDC’s list of underlying medical conditions that would make someone eligible for a Moderna or Pfizer booster six months after their second dose doesn’t specifically list endometriosis. The list of underlying medical conditions includes several conditions, including:

  • Pregnancy
  • Chronic lung disease
  • Diabetes
  • Heart conditions
  • Obesity
  • Smoking or smoking history

All adults over 18 who received the single-dose Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine are eligible for a booster shot at least two months after receiving their shot.

The CDC recommendations were released after the FDA amended the emergency use authorizations for the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines to allow for booster doses.

Mix and Match Doses

The FDA authorized mix and match booster doses for the three COVID-19 vaccines available in the United States. This means that you can receive a booster dose of a different vaccine from your original vaccine. For example, any adult over 18 who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine can receive a booster dose of the Pfizer, Moderna, or Johnson & Johnson vaccines at least two months after receiving their shot. Those who have received the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines and are eligible for a booster may receive it from any of the three companies six months after their second dose.

Additional Doses for People Who Are Immunocompromised

A COVID-19 vaccine booster is administered when someone developed adequate immunity after the initial vaccine dose or doses, but that immunity has decreased over time. An additional dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine 28 days following the second dose may be recommended for those who did not develop an adequate immune response after the two-dose vaccination series.

The FDA amended the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines’ emergency use authorizations on Aug. 12 to allow a third vaccine dose for certain immunocompromised individuals.

Individuals defined as immunocompromised include:

  • People in cancer treatment
  • People who received a stem cell transplant in the last two years
  • People who are organ donor recipients and taking immunosuppressive drugs
  • People taking high-dose steroids or other immunosuppressive drugs
  • Those with certain other health conditions

“In general, people with endometriosis are not immunocompromised, assuming there are no other immune issues involved,” Dr. Nicholas Fogelson, a gynecologic surgeon and founder of Northwest Endometriosis and Pelvic Surgery in Portland, Oregon, told MyEndometriosisTeam in September.

However, people with endometriosis who are considered immunocompromised due to another health condition may be eligible for a third dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines 28 days following their second dose.

Learn More

MyEndometriosisTeam previously spoke with Dr. Fogelson about endometriosis and COVID-19 vaccines in April. In that conversation, Dr. Fogelson addressed questions about endometriosis medications and surgeries as they relate to vaccination.

Talk to your doctor if you have questions about your eligibility for an additional COVID-19 vaccine dose or if you have questions about vaccine safety.

A MyEndometriosisTeam Member said:

Hi Dan, i am endometriois suffer i had four surgeries to not only remove the endo because where it was sitting and spreading and kept coming bck after 6 months instead of year or two i was told mite… read more

posted 30 days ago

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Dan Martin, M.D. is the scientific and medical director of the Endometriosis Foundation of America. Learn more about him here.
Alison Channon has nearly a decade of experience writing about chronic health conditions, mental health, and women's health. Learn more about her here.

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